Invented by Tamir S. Levi, Edwards Lifesciences Corp

The Market for Gripping and Pushing Devices for Medical Instruments In recent years, there has been a growing demand for innovative medical devices that can assist healthcare professionals in performing various medical procedures more efficiently and accurately. One such device that has gained significant attention is the gripping and pushing device for medical instruments. These devices are designed to provide a secure grip and controlled movement of medical instruments during surgical procedures. They are particularly useful in minimally invasive surgeries, where precision and dexterity are crucial. Gripping and pushing devices enhance the surgeon’s ability to manipulate instruments with greater ease, reducing the risk of accidental slippage or damage to delicate tissues. The market for gripping and pushing devices for medical instruments is expected to witness substantial growth in the coming years. The increasing prevalence of chronic diseases and the rising demand for minimally invasive surgeries are the key factors driving this market’s expansion. According to a report by Grand View Research, the global minimally invasive surgical instruments market is projected to reach $24.8 billion by 2025, creating a significant opportunity for gripping and pushing device manufacturers. One of the primary advantages of these devices is their ability to improve surgical outcomes by minimizing human error. Surgeons can achieve more precise movements and better control over instruments, leading to reduced complications and faster patient recovery. Additionally, gripping and pushing devices can enhance ergonomics for healthcare professionals, reducing the risk of musculoskeletal injuries caused by repetitive motions. The market for gripping and pushing devices is highly competitive, with several established players and new entrants vying for market share. Companies such as Medtronic, Stryker Corporation, and Intuitive Surgical dominate the market, offering a wide range of innovative devices. These companies invest heavily in research and development to introduce advanced technologies that meet the evolving needs of healthcare professionals. Furthermore, technological advancements, such as the integration of robotics and artificial intelligence, are expected to revolutionize the gripping and pushing device market. Robotic-assisted surgical systems, such as the da Vinci Surgical System, have already gained significant popularity due to their ability to enhance surgical precision and reduce invasiveness. As these technologies continue to evolve, the demand for gripping and pushing devices that complement these systems is likely to increase. However, despite the market’s potential, there are a few challenges that manufacturers need to address. The high cost of these devices remains a significant barrier to their widespread adoption, particularly in developing countries. Additionally, the lack of skilled healthcare professionals trained in using these devices can limit their utilization. To overcome these challenges, manufacturers are focusing on developing cost-effective solutions without compromising on quality. They are also investing in training programs to educate healthcare professionals on the proper use of gripping and pushing devices. Moreover, collaborations with hospitals and research institutions are being established to conduct clinical trials and gather real-world data on the devices’ effectiveness. In conclusion, the market for gripping and pushing devices for medical instruments is poised for substantial growth in the coming years. The increasing demand for minimally invasive surgeries and the need for improved surgical outcomes are driving the adoption of these devices. With ongoing technological advancements and efforts to address cost and training challenges, gripping and pushing device manufacturers are well-positioned to capitalize on this expanding market.

The Edwards Lifesciences Corp invention works as follows

In one embodiment, the gripping and push device for a surgical instrument has an elongated body that defines a lumen. The elongated body has one or more deflectable parts that can be radially pressed inwardly towards a shaft of a medical instrument extending into the lumen. At axially separated attachment locations, one or more gripping layers made of elastomeric can be attached to the inner surface a deflectable part. When manual pressure is applied between attachment locations, the one- or more gripping layer can be axially deformed relative to the deflectable portion.

Background for Gripping and Pushing Device for Medical Instrument

Elongated instruments are inserted in a patient’s torso to perform various procedures.” Catheters are used, for instance, to insert into a patient to drain fluids or to implant medical devices, such as prosthetic valves or stents. Cardiac cathode, for example, is used to perform angioplasty, or implant a prosthetic valve. A relatively long catheter can be advanced through the vasculature of the patient in order to reach the heart. In one method, for instance, the catheter could be advanced through the femoral arterial and aorta in order to reach the heart.

The construction of catheters makes it difficult to control and advance them, particularly for cardiac catheterization. User must often manipulate or torque the catheter shaft at the proximal tip to enable advancement of the catheter in the desired orientation. These tubular catheters must be rigid to provide the necessary control of the catheter’s movement. Catheters must still be flexible to allow them to move through the lumen of the body to reach the desired site within the body for the medical procedure. A catheter shaft that is too rigid will have difficulty tracking or following a guidewire. It is important to grip the narrow shaft at the point where the catheter enters the vasculature of the patient rather than the handle. This will prevent the shaft from buckling. It is difficult to maintain a firm grip on the narrow shaft, which is necessary for control. A tight grip can also cause user fatigue.

The device must allow a physician to better insert a medical tool and control its advancement through the body of a patient.

The present disclosure is aimed at embodiments of a grasping and pushing device that can be used with a medical tool that is insertable in a patient’s flesh. In some embodiments, the device is attached to a narrow, elongated part of the medical tool, such as the shaft or tubular members. In order to grip the shaft, the practitioner can grip or squeeze the gripping device. This grips the shaft and transfers the pushing, pulling, and/or rotating motions of the practitioner’s hands to the shaft. The gripping device allows the practitioner a greater gripping surface to control the medical tool with less fatigue when the instrument is being pushed, torqued or otherwise manipulated in the body of the patient.

To increase the gripping strength of the device on the shaft of the instrument, the device may include at least one layer of gripping material attached to the inner surface of the deflectable portion.” The deflectable part will deflect inwards radially when gripped, and the gripping layer will be pressed against the shaft. The gripping portion can be made from a material with a higher coefficient of friction. In certain embodiments, the gripping material is attached to the inner surface the deflectable part at axially separated attachment locations (such a with a suitable glue) to create unsecured portions. The gripping layer’s unsecured portions are axially flexible. When gripping or pushing forces are applied, the unsecured parts can “bunch up” Or, they can form non-linear segments to enhance the gripping force.

In one embodiment, the gripping and push device for a surgical instrument has an elongated body that defines a lumen. The elongated body has one or more deflectable parts that can be radially pressed inwardly towards a shaft of a medical instrument extending into the lumen. At axially separated attachment locations, one or more gripping layers made of elastomeric can be attached to the inner surface a deflectable part. When manual pressure is applied between attachment locations, the one- or more gripping layer can be axially deformed relative to the deflectable portion.

In another representative embodiment, inserting a surgical instrument into a patient’s body comprises gripping the gripping and pressing device located on the shaft of the instrument. The gripping device has at least one deflectable section and at least a gripping layer attached to the inner surface of the portion at axially separated attachment locations. When gripping the device, the deflectable segment deflects toward the shaft to press the gripping material against the shaft. The gripping device is pushed towards the patient while the gripping device is gripped. This allows the medical instrument to be advanced into the body of the patient.

In another representative embodiment, the medical assembly includes a delivery device for delivering a prothetic device into a body of a patient. The delivery apparatus includes a handle, and an elongated shaft that extends from the handle. The assembly also includes a gripping-and-pushing device mounted on the shaft. The gripping-and-pushing device has an elongated body that defines a lumen in which the shaft extends. The elongated body has at least one deflectable part and at least a gripping layer attached to the inner surface of this deflectable part at attachment locations axially separated so as to define between these attachment locations one or more unsecured gripping layers. The deflectable part is deflectable between a non-deflected and deflected positions with the gripping layers radially separated from the shaft.

The following detailed description will be more evident with the help of the accompanying figures.

For the purposes of this explanation, certain aspects, benefits, and novel features are described. The disclosure of the present invention is aimed at all non-obvious and novel features and aspects in the disclosed embodiments alone, and also in different combinations. The disclosed embodiments are not restricted to any particular aspect, feature, or combination of those.

Features” are defined as “integers, characteristics, chemical groups, moieties, or compounds” that have been described with respect to a certain aspect, embodiment, or example. These features, attributes, or compounds can be applied to other aspects, embodiments, or examples unless they are incompatible. All features described in this specification, including any accompanying abstracts, claims and drawings, and/or any steps of any method disclosed may be combined, with the exception of combinations in which at least one of these features or steps is mutually exclusive. The invention does not limit itself to any of the foregoing examples. “The invention includes any new feature, or novel combination of features, disclosed in the specification (including the accompanying claims and abstracts, drawings, or drawings), or any new step, or novel combination of steps, disclosed by any method or procedure.

Although some disclosed methods have been described in a sequential order to facilitate presentation, this description includes rearrangement unless specific language requires a certain ordering. In some cases, sequential operations can be rearranged and performed simultaneously. For simplicity’s sake, the figures attached may not depict all the ways that the disclosed methods can work in conjunction with each other. The terms ‘a?, ‘an? and ‘at least one? are used in this document. One or more elements are included. If two elements of the same type are present, then one of them is also present. The term ‘a plurality of? The term ‘plural’ is used. The terms?plural? and?a plurality of? “plural” means two or more elements.

As used in this document, the term “and/or” is used between the last two elements of a list. When used between two elements, it means that any of them can be included. The phrase “A, B and/or C” is an example. “A”, “B”, or “C” can mean ‘A, B and/or C, ‘A and B,?, ‘A and C,?, B and C,?, or if you prefer, a phrase like :.

The term “coupled” is used in this context to mean physically coupled or linked and does not exclude the presence of intermediate elements between the coupled items. “Physically coupled” or “linked” is used to describe items that are physically linked.

The present disclosure is directed at embodiments of a grasping and pushing device that can be used with a medical tool that is insertable in a patient’s body. The embodiment illustrated is described as a method of inserting a catheter or delivery apparatus into a patient?s vasculature. It should be understood, however, that the embodiments described herein can use any of a variety of medical instruments to perform a range of medical procedures such as administering medication or fluids to a patient, implanting prosthetic devices, and draining fluids to name just a few. Other medical instruments that can be used in conjunction with the disclosed embodiments are needles, stylets and cannulas.

In general the gripping-and-pushing device is attached to a narrow, elongated part of the medical instrument such as a shaft, tubular member, or other similar structure. In place of directly gripping the shaft, a practitioner may squeeze or grip the device. This grips the shaft and transfers the pushing, pulling, and/or rotating motions of the practitioner’s hands to the shaft. The larger area of the gripping and pressing device allows the practitioner a more comfortable grip on the medical instrument. This is especially useful when wearing gloves made of latex or polymers. The outer surface can become slippery if the gloves are covered with blood, saline or other fluids.

FIG. The delivery system 100 shown in Figure 1 is used to deliver a prosthetic implant (e.g. a prosthetic stent or valve) into a patient’s body. The delivery system can consist of a delivery device (also known as a catheter or delivery device) 102, and an introducer. The delivery apparatus can have a handle 106, and an elongated shaft (not shown) extending from the handle. The shaft 108 can have an implantable prosthetic (e.g. a prosthetic stent or valve) mounted compressed on the distal end.

The shaft 108 is shaped and sized to allow it to be advanced into the vasculature of the patient to the desired location for the implantation of the prosthetic device. In a transfemoral surgery, the shaft is pushed retrogradely through the aorta and femoral artery to reach the heart. In a second transfemoral surgery, the shaft is pushed in an antegrade manner through the femoral vein to reach the heart. The shaft 108 may be 48 inches long or longer for transfemoral delivery.

The introducer 104 may include a housing and an elongated sleeve 112 that extends distally away from the housing. The sheath 112 is inserted into the vasculature of the patient (e.g. a surgical cut of a femoral arterial) before the shaft 108 from the delivery apparatus 102 is inserted into the vasculature. The housing 110 may have one or multiple seals that engage the shaft 108 to minimize blood loss. Introducer 104 can be used to facilitate the introduction of the delivery device into the vasculature. It also protects against injury to the vessel. In certain applications, however the delivery apparatus may be directly inserted into the vasculature of the patient without using the introducer. The U.S. Patent Application Publication 2013, which incorporates this document by reference, contains further details about the delivery apparatus 102 as well as the introducer 104.

As shown in FIG. According to one embodiment of the invention, a catheter pushing and gripping device 200 is mounted to the shaft of the delivery device 102. It can be used to manipulate the shaft, for example, to push the shaft into a patient’s vasculature, (e.g. a femoral arterial and an aorta), and/or to torque the shaft in order to steer or place the prosthetic device inside the body. The gripping and pressing device 200 can be used for a wide range of applications, including pushing and/or adjusting catheters or other medical instruments in various parts of the human body. It is not restricted to use with delivery apparatuses for delivering prosthetic devices.

As best shown in FIGS. The pushing device 200 of the illustrated embodiment consists of an elongated body 202 that is mounted to and extends from an inner shaft or tube 218. The body 202 can define a lumen and be provided with two longitudinally extending slots, one on each side of the body. This creates two deflectable, elongated portions. The first slot can extend along the entire length (FIG. 5A), whereas the second slot can be a partial slots extending less than the full length of the body. The second slot 208, for example, can extend from the proximal part of the body to the proximal portion of the inner tube 218, as shown in FIG. 6). The distal end portion of the body 202 (e.g. with an adhesive) is attached to the inner tub 218 so that the legs 210 and 212 cantilever from the tube and can be pressed against each other during use.

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